Episode 14: How Justice Defenders is Using Education to Defend the Defenceless

April 29, 2022
Episode 14: How Justice Defenders is Using Education to Defend the Defenceless #BreakTheBias #PrisonReform #UrbanPlanning #Podcast #justcity

In this episode, my co-host Hannah Ahamedi and I chatted with Milly Kakungulu, the Education Department Lead at Justice Defenders Uganda. Through our discussion, we learned more about how the Justice Defenders (formerly known as the African Prisons Project) are defending the defenceless by educating prisoners on how to provide legal services for themselves and others. Thanks to Justice Defenders' various training opportunities and a people-centred approach to justice, prisoners and prison staff can become paralegals and lawyers whose newfound skills help improve access to fair trials and legal services, and ultimately close the ever-growing global justice gap. What started off as a discussion about the non-profit's work, ended up in a deeper discussion about justice, equity, humanity, and community and how important it is to keep those four principles if we hope to transform our legal systems for the better.

In this episode, you'll learn about:

  • the importance of a people-centred approach to justice,
  • the different challenges that prisoners face with getting access to justice in the current legal system,  
  • the Justice Defenders model (education, training, practice) and the various opportunities that Justice Defenders provides participants,
  • how prisoners have leveraged the education Justice Defenders' has provided them to transform their own lives and influence policies that improve justice within their communities at various government levels,
  • the Reach Alliance and how our research project inspired Hannah and I to create this episode
  • and much more!


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Guest: Milly Kakungulu, Education Department Lead

Co-Host: Hannah Ahamedi

My name is Hannah Ahamedi and I am a researcher at the Reach Alliance focusing specifically on information dissemination in South Sudan. My research interests include the Swahili Coast, oral histories, feminist grassroots peacebuilding, global innovation, and conflict resolution. I am looking forward to graduating from Victoria College at the University of Toronto this spring with a B.A (hons) in Peace, Conflict, and Justice Studies, Diaspora/Transnational Studies, and History.  In my spare time you can usually find me reading sci-fi/fantasy novels, going to the gym, and taking part in numerous volunteer activities that I find incredibly fulfilling. 

To learn more about her click here.

Timestamps

  • 01:26 | An introduction to my co-host Hannah, the Reach Alliance, and why we chose this topic
  • 14:25 | An introduction to our guest Milly and her work
  • 16:41 | An overview of Justice Defenders' services and impact
  • 25:00 | Can you walk us through the Justice Defenders model  (education, training, practice) and some of the opportunities that Justice Defenders provide to participants?
  • 32:40 | What have been some of the challenges that Justice Defenders face in doing your work?
  • 36:21 | What are the challenges that prisoners face in prisons and how has Justice Defenders' overcome them and provided an amenable learning environment?
  • 41:20 | Understanding that you have probably encountered some very inspirational people in your work with Justice Defenders, would you feel comfortable sharing a story of a moment where you felt the most impactful?
  • 46:47 | Do you think that Justice Defenders has an equal impact on women in prisons?
  • 48:35 | How does working in women's prisons differ from men's prisons?
  • 51:00 | What is people-centred justice?
  • 56:20 | Seeing that East Africa is still considerably impacted by the British colonial system, does Justice Defenders have future plans to emphasize traditional or pre-colonial indigenous justice systems?
  • 1:02:01 | How can people get involved with the organization?
  • 1:01:15 | We know that already expanded to the USA and set up a branch there. Do Justice Defenders see itself expanding across the continent?
  • 1:01:15 | How can people get involved with the organization?
  • 1:05:20 | Key takeaways from our conversation

Show Notes

Want to learn more? Check out this episode's references!

Justice Defenders. (n.d.). Justice Defenders. https://www.justice-defenders.org/

Task Force on Justice. (2019). Justice for All – Final Report. https://bf889554-6857-4cfe-8d55-8770007b8841.filesusr.com/ugd/90b3d6_7cc00af558bf46a88fb262e6a467f819.pdf

Acknowledgements

Sponsorships

This episode is co-sponsored by the University of Toronto School of Cities and the Department of Geography and Planning. 

The School of Cities "convenes urban-focused researchers, educators, students, practitioners and the general public to explore and address complex urban challenges, with the aim of making cities and urban regions more sustainable, prosperous, inclusive and just". To learn more about the School of Cities visit www.schoolofcities.utoronto.ca

To learn more about the Department of Geography and Planning and the different undergraduate and graduate programs available please visit www.geography.utoronto.ca.

Support
  • Editor and Research Assistant: Hannah Ahamedi
  • Music Producer: Imany Lambropoulos
  • Podcast Host and Graphic Designer: Alexandra Lambropoulos

Stay in the loop!

If you would like to be interviewed, have an interesting idea to share for an episode, or have any feedback on the podcast, please send me an email at hello[at]urbanlimitrophe.com.

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Episode 14: How Justice Defenders is Using Education to Defend the Defenceless #BreakTheBias #PrisonReform #UrbanPlanning #Podcast #justcity
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Meet the Urban Limitrophe Team

April 23, 2022


If you've been listening to recent episodes of Urban Limitrophe then you've probably noticed a few recurring names in the credits of the podcast. If you're wondering who they are, wait no more! It's time to put some faces to the names you've been hearing and introduce the Urban Limitrophe team: Hannah and Imany!

Hannah Ahamedi, Editor (and Co-Host)*

My name is Hannah Ahamedi and I am a researcher at the Reach Alliance focusing specifically on information dissemination in South Sudan. My research interests include the Swahili Coast, oral histories, feminist grassroots peacebuilding, global innovation, and conflict resolution. I am looking forward to graduating from Victoria College at the University of Toronto this spring with a B.A (hons) in Peace, Conflict, and Justice Studies, Diaspora/Transnational Studies, and History.  In my spare time you can usually find me reading sci-fi/fantasy novels, going to the gym, and taking part in numerous volunteer activities that I find incredibly fulfilling. 

What is an African city that you would most like to visit? 
A difficult question since I have a very very long list BUT Luxor in Egypt definitely takes the number one spot. 

What’s your favourite song sung by an African artist? 
Malaika by Miriam Makeba. My father used to sing it to me when I was a child and it brings back good memories. 

What’s a book that you think people should know about? 
Mans Search for Meaning by Viktor Frankl! I have probably read it about 5 times. It always provides clarity to me in the moments I need it most. 

The future of Africa is ___?
Limitless

Tell us a fun fact about you!
I am of Kenyan/Yemeni/Canadian descent! 

Get in Touch with Hannah on:

Imany Lambropoulos, Music Producer

My name is Imany Lambropoulos, and I am a high school student. I am interested in neuroscience, and I am interested in potentially becoming a neuropsychologist or a clinical psychologist. In the future, I would like to attend either Queen’s University or the University of Toronto to further my studies, and I intend on obtaining my Ph.D. degree. In my spare time, I enjoy reading all sorts of books. My favourite genres include fantasy, sci-fi, and the occasional mystery novels. I also enjoy spending time with my friends, finding new restaurants to visit, or watching movies and tv shows together. 

What is an African city that you would most like to visit?
There are a lot of African cities that I think would be interesting to visit but, if I had to pick one it would be Cairo. 

What’s your favourite song sung by an African artist?
My favourite song sung by an African artist is Tumbum by Yemi Alade

What’s a book that you think people should know about?
Beasts of Little Land by Juhea Kim 

The future of Africa is ___?
Its people.

Tell us a fun fact about you!
I can play the saxophone. 

* Hannah will be a co-host on an upcoming episode of the podcast where we speak with Milly Kakungulu from Justice Defenders. To learn more about Hannah and Justice Defenders' amazing work make sure to subscribe, follow on social media, and stay tuned for new episodes coming your way.

Episode 13: How Lima’s Sonic Landscapes Are Shaped by Afro-Peruvian Women

April 03, 2022

In this episode, I chat again with Roxana Escobar Ñañez. Roxana is pursuing her Ph.D. in Human Geography at the University of Toronto and she was recently one of five special guests on the 12th episode of the podcast. Given her unique research interests, after our last conversation, I decided to invite her to the show again to dive deeper into her work examining 'the places Afro-Peruvian women hold in Lima’s sonic landscapes' and Black womanhood in Latin America and to get a better understanding about how these themes of music, Blackness, and cities emerge in the diaspora. What started off as a discussion of her research turned into a vivid exploration of Lima's history through the lens of Afro-Peruvian music, food, culture, and most importantly Black joy and resilience. 

In this episode, you'll learn about:

  • the project of mestizaje and the origins of criollo music and culture in Peru,
  • what are sonic landscapes and how Afro-Peruvian women, in particular, are essential to shaping Lima's vibrant soundscape and unique cultural identity,
  • the key characteristics of Afro-Peruvian music, 
  • additional resources and artists to help you learn more about Afro-Peruvian culture and its impact in Peru,
  • the importance of highlighting Black joy when researching Black histories and geographies,
  • and much more!


Powered by RedCircle

You can listen to the podcast on Spotify Google Podcasts | Stitcher | RSS | Apple Podcasts 

This episode is sponsored by the University of Toronto School of Cities. The School of Cities "convenes urban-focused researchers, educators, students, practitioners and the general public to explore and address complex urban challenges, with the aim of making cities and urban regions more sustainable, prosperous, inclusive and just". To learn more about their work visit www.schoolofcities.utoronto.ca.

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